TIGER DRAMA AUDITIONS &
Production OPPORTUNITIES

From classes to productions to community, state, and national festivals; Tiger Drama offers multiple ways to get involved. During their time in our department, many students get the opportunity to work on a variety of backstage crews, be onstage, design and build production elements, take master classes from industry experts, see full live productions, and be an active part in creating art within our community.

How can I be involved in a Tiger Drama production?

CREW Descriptions

Dance Captain & Assistant Choreographer


Dance captains help warm up the performers physically for each production and are in charge of helping clean numbers and make sure each performer is executing choreography correctly. Assistant choreographers also sometimes help with the construction/staging of specific numbers. Works closely with the Choreographer.




Spotlight Operators


Highlight specific actors with light throughout scenes/songs. Requires a steady hand and ultimate focus/attention to detail. Works closely with the Stage Manager who calls each show from the light booth.




Light Board Operator


Runs the lights for the production and sometimes makes minor adjustments to cues while in tech rehearsals. Works closely with the Stage Manager who calls each show from the light booth.




Hair & Makeup Crew


Responsible for helping cast members with makeup and specialty makeup looks and basic hair design/styling. Also responsible for maintaining wigs and hair accessories. Works closely with the Director and Designers.




Wardrobe Crew


Assist in steaming and minor repairs of costumes as well as organization each night and quick changes within the production. Wardrobe crew sets up and stores the costumes before and after the performance. Works closely with the Costume Designers.




Props Crew


Responsible for pulling/constructing/locating the props required within the show. Each night they setup the prop table and are responsible for where each prop ends up so it can be used the next night. Works closely with the Director.




Backstage and Fly Crew


Responsible for making sure scene changes and set movements happen seamlessly and efficiently. They are responsible for sometimes flying in scenery from above head and ensuring all cast/crew members are safe backstage. Our backstage crew sets up scenery prior to the show, runs the show, and then puts scenery away/stores if for the next night. Works closely with the Assistant Stage Managers.




Sound Assistants


Assist with sound cues during the production and helping actors into/out of microphones and recharging batteries for each performance. They sometimes need to run backstage and solve issues during a performance. Works closely with the Sound Designer.




House Managers and Ushers


Responsible for the front of house experience for our audience. Ushers take tickets and hand out programs. House Managers help ensure a quality experience and solve problems if any arise. Ushers and HM also help clean the auditorium following the production. Works closely with STAGE parents.




Stage Manager (SM)


Our stage managers for the season are often determined at the begnning of each season so that the SM/ASM can be actively involved in the entire production process. The main duty and responsibility of the stage manager is to work with the directors to make sure everything runs smoothly. Being a stage manager involves being stern enough to keep your peers in line, but compassionate enough to understand any circumstances that may arise. You must be a good communicator with your peers and the directors and be willing to delegate tasks to the ASM. Keep in mind that if you have questions about others behaviors, the best policy is to ask a director what action should be taken. It is not the job of the SM to discipline another company member. SMs are expected to be at all rehearsals.

  • Auditions:
    • Coordinate auditions with director as to type of auditions.
    • Collect audition forms, organize, and supply them to directors.
  • Preparation:
    • Coordinate with director to create rehearsal attendance record and contact sheet.
    • Make sure all company members have received and returned contracts and release forms.
    • Create a stage manager binder that includes blocking script, calling script, contact sheet, attendance record, and any other technical paperwork that is available (lighting cue sheet, sound cue sheet, costume chart, prop list, ect.).
    • Get with ASM to discuss responsibilities.
  • Rehearsals:
    • Check in with technicians and designers to make sure their supplies are ready. This includes:
      • Props: check with prop master as to what props are available.
      • Lights/Sound: check with director if we are using lights/sound for rehearsal. Communicate that with lights/sound.
      • Costume: check with director if we are using any costume pieces. Communicate that with costume mistress.
      • Set: Check with technical director as to what set pieces can be used. Communicate with stagehands what will be used and if any movement will be needed.
    • Take roll of company members during actor warm up. Contact those who are not present.
    • Let director know of anyone who may not be at rehearsal and reason for absence.
    • Take blocking notes during rehearsal.
    • Respond to “line” if called.
    • Keep company members updated on any changes to rehearsal schedule and send out reminders.
  • Tech Week:
    • Stage manager must be ready to run cue to cue rehearsal in tangent with directors.
    • Respond to all director calls including where to start, when to start and stop, and any technical notes.
    • Check with lights and sounds to make sure you have the same cues written down.
    • Responsible for calling all cues. Have “stand by” cues ready 1 to 2 lines before each cue.
    • Ensures the show is running smoothly. Tell directors of any technical issues that may be happening.
    • Make sure actors are aware of when and where to start and stop.
  • Running the Show:
    • Oversees the entire show each time it is performed, calling cues.
    • All production personnel and actors report to the stage manager. Take roll and contact anyone who is not on time for call.
    • Call times as pre-show prep is happening. Some of these may overlap and happen at the same time. This includes:
      • 1 hour, 30 minutes
      • 1 hour (warm-ups onstage)
      • 15 minutes until house opens (check props)
      • 30 minutes/house open
      • Meeting in Pschirrer's room
      • Places




Assistant Stage Manager (ASM)


Assists and trains with the stage manager for each production. The SM will often delligate duties and work closely with their ASMs to ensure reasonable division of work and responsibilities. ASMs are typically assigned at the beginning of the season so they can be actively involved in the entire production process.





I want to work BACKSTAGE: Crew Info

How can I apply to work backstage/on crew?


Crew applications are available 2 weeks prior to auditions outside room 129 and online. Those interested in applying to be on a crew should thoughtfully fill out the application and rank your crew preferences in order (1 being the crew you would most like to serve on). If you are not wanting to work on a specific crew, please say 'NO' in the appropriate box. Specific job descriptions are found on the Crew Descriptions tab on this website. As we are working on casting the production, we also 'cast' our crew members so they are in on the process from the first day. Crew members attend and assist at our first cast and crew read thrus and may be asked to attend/participate in work days throughout the reherasal process. At casting, we also 'cast' crew leads. These crew members are in charge of managing their specific crews. The crew leads often (but not always) come out of our Satgecraft class.




How are crew members selected?


Our Production Team is committed to thoughtful casting/crew selection based on crew application and previous experience. This means we select the crew best suited to the many factors involved in the production. There are not enough roles/positions for everyone to have a part in every production. However, we are also committed to providing as many performance opportunities as possible through our multiple showcase nights, all school productions, class productions, and Regional and State Festivals.

Each show is different and has different requirements when it comes to crew assignments. Sometimes a particular crew assignment might not be needed at all. The size of each crew also varies with each production.




What is expected as a crew member?


  • All cast and crew and their parents must sign a performance contract and the GSL Co-Curricular Contract. Violation of either contract is grounds for dismissal from the production.
  • Attend all scheduled rehearsals. There will always be an accurate rehearsal schedule at least a week in advance.
  • ALL Cast and crew are required to attend EVERY dress/technical rehearsal and ALL performances.
  • Cast and crew members are strongly encouraged to purchase a Production Pack for the show they are involved with.
  • Cast and crew members are required to attend a minimum of a HALF DAY of school on any dress rehearsal and performance days. Students who do not comply with this requirement will not be permitted to rehearse or perform on that day per WIAA Regulations.





I want to be ONSTAGE: Audition Info

What happens at a play or musical audition?


For all types of auditions, you will read and complete the audition packet found online or outside room 129. Anything you need to prepare ahead of time will be explained in the audition packet. PLAYS:

  • MONOLOGUES: For plays, everyone prepares and presents a small section of a monologue. Details and examples can be found in the show specific audition packet.
  • COLD READS: For both plays and musicals, everyone will cold read from the script. "Sides" are selections of dialogue (two or more characters talking) provided at the audition. Cold reading means actors have not seen the sides in advance of the audition. The actors are expected to read the dialogue with as much character and purpose as they can, given the limited amount of time they have had to view the lines and prepare. (See the tips & tricks section for more details.)
MUSICALS:
  • VOCAL AUDITIONS: For musicals, everyone prepares a small cutting of a pre-selected song listed in the audition packet to sing in small groups (4-6 people). At the initial musical audition, no one is asked to sing alone!
  • DANCE CALL: As a large group, you will be asked to learn a dance combination. Please wear comfortable clothing and shoes that you can move easily in. You will dance in small groups (5-6 people).
  • COLD READS: For both plays and musicals, everyone will cold read from the script. "Sides" are selections of dialogue (two or more characters talking) provided at the audition. Cold reading means actors have not seen the sides in advance of the audition. The actors are expected to read the dialogue with as much character and purpose as they can, given the limited amount of time they have had to view the lines and prepare. (See the tips & tricks section for more details.)




What are callbacks?


Directors hold callbacks when they want to learn more about specific actors after an initial audition. The director may want to see how certain actors fit specific roles or just to see what else the actors can do. While callbacks can sometimes feel like an elimination round in a contest, it is important to keep in mind that the director could still cast anyone in any role, even if they have not been called back. Often, directors only need to look at a handful of actors in greater depth for a few specific roles. Nobody is entitled to a callback, as they are purely a tool that the director uses to help them build on the decisions that have been made after the first round of auditions. For a musical callback, actors are often asked to prepare sections of songs and dialogue (sides) for specific characters. Sometimes, a dance callback may be necessary as well.




What will I be asked to do if I get a callback?


BOTH PLAYS AND MUSICALS: COLD READINGS: You will be asked to do more cold readings from the script. We typically like to see readings with different pairings of students. Do your best to listen and react to your scene partner in an authentic manner. This is your opportunity to show a glimpse of what it might look like if you were to play this role. MUSICAL CALLBACKS: VOCAL CALLBACKS: You could be asked to perform one or more of the callback songs listed in the audition packet. Sheet music is available at tigerdrama.com. Callback songs should be learned and rehearsed prior to the callback. You will get a chance to sing as an ensemble a few times before singing by yourself. DANCE CALLBACKS: You could be asked to perform the choreography taught at the initial audition. Sometimes we teach new choreography at the callback to test different skills and styles. You will be told if you need to bring special shoes. Remember to wear clothing appropriate for dancing.




How are casting decisions made?


Our Production Team is committed to thoughtful cast/crew selection. This means we cast the person best suited to the many factors involved in the production. There are not enough roles/positions for everyone to have a part in every production. However, we are also committed to providing as many performance opportunities as possible through our multiple showcase nights, all school productions, class productions, and Regional and State Festivals. Below are the primary qualities considered in casting actors and crew members:

  • Attitude: Do they have a positive attitude? Do they work well with and respect directors and peers?
  • Reliability: How well have they fulfilled previous commitments. (Sometimes this reliability is demonstrated in classes/shows or other activities/clubs at LC.)
  • Ability/Type: Can they play a particular role(s) well?
Casting a show is like putting together a puzzle; everything must fit together just right. In an educational setting, we regularly come across situations where many students would be good for one role while also finding that we have a very limited number of students that can effectively execute other roles. This means that the Production Team considers the big picture and how to make the puzzle work best for the whole production. The idea is to create the best overall production so that everyone benefits from being part of something that is far greater than any one individual.




What should I do if I am disappointed?


Learning to handle disappointment is one of the most essential skills young artists must develop. It is equally important for all of us to learn to objectively recognize and evaluate our strengths and weaknesses; this is the only way to grow. It is normal to feel disappointed when finding out that you weren't cast in a show or that you weren't cast in a role/crew position you had hoped for. The first thing to do is to let yourself feel your feelings and grieve. It is important to keep everything in perspective; there will always be more opportunities, even if not at LC. You recover from these feelings fastest by focusing on what you can learn and how you can grow from the experience. This may include both learning through the role you have in the show as well as learning from the audition process. While emotions might be running high and students/parents may feel the desire to contact the director right after a cast list is published, communication will be more effective if some time has passed. We encourage students to ask for feedback to grow in resiliency and focus on future opportunities. Directors can meet with a student who would like feedback on how to learn from their audition experience focusing on how to prepare for the next audition. We understand there will always be disappointments and we seek to help everyone grow through the process.




Audition Tips and Tricks


TRY YOUR BEST & COMMIT: Directors can tell when you are engaged and making an effort! When you commit to any acting/dancing/singing choice you make, it shows that you are willing to try and that makes you a smart and directable actor. SPEAK LOUDER THAN YOU THINK YOU NEED TO: The LC auditorium is very large and filling the space with sound is very important. If you feel like you’re speaking uncomfortably loud, it’s probably just right for the Production Team trying to hear you from far away. COLD READS: Hold the script at a distance you can see without covering your face. Listen and react to the person/people with whom you are reading. Try not to do your reading with the same physical/vocal choices other people have made. HAVE FUN! Even if you’re nervous, remember that auditions can be fun and you can make friends who are in the same nervous boat. It’s great to work with those who can make stressful situations more comfortable. Be that person who makes the room a positive place to be!




When are rehearsals?


Our rehearsals typically run Monday-Friday from 2:45-5:00 in the LCHS Auditorium. Check out the rehearsal calendar for specific time, place, and cast members called for each rehersal.





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